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Getting Started with Brightbox Manager

Brightbox Manager is a browser-based graphical user interface for managing Brightbox Cloud resources.

It’s accessible at https://manage.brightbox.com. You’ll need to have an active Brightbox Cloud account to login.

This guide will take you through building and accessing your first cloud server.

Once you’ve logged into Brightbox Manager you’re presented with the dashboard which gives an overview of your account.

Setting an ssh key

When a new server is built, it will attempt to install your SSH key on boot so you can log into it. If you didn’t specify a public SSH key when you first signed up for Brightbox Cloud then you’ll need to set one now.

Building a server

Click Cloud Servers in the sidebar on the left to view the server manager. This is a new account so there aren’t any servers yet.

Click New Cloud Server to show the dialog box for configuring a new server.

Choose a suitable name for your first server and select whichever server type you’d like. Here I’ve increased it to a Mini which gives us 1GB RAM. The costs of each different server type are available on the pricing page.

Then switch to the Image tab to choose which server image to use; basically you’re choosing which operating system to install. I’ve selected an official 64bit Ubuntu 14.04 image here:

Now click Create and your new server will begin building. This usually takes about 30 seconds and the status will update automatically when it’s ready, so no need to refresh the page impatiently :)

As you can see here, we’ve built one new server and it’s been given the identifier srv-dmw0k.

Your server is now active

At this point your server is active and if you have an IPv6 internet connection or tunnel, you can connect directly to it with SSH using the IPv6 DNS name. Our official Ubuntu images are pre-installed with a user named ubuntu. You can use sudo to get root access:

$ ssh -l ubuntu ipv6.srv-dmw0k.gb1.brightbox.com
The authenticity of host 'ipv6.srv-dmw0k.gb1.brightbox.com (2a02:1348:178:42e9:24:19ff:fee1:ba6)' can't be established.
ECDSA key fingerprint is f4:a0:2f:61:91:6e:4b:d0:3e:95:c4:ea:75:73:8e:85.
Are you sure you want to continue connecting (yes/no)? yes
Warning: Permanently added 'ipv6.srv-dmw0k.gb1.brightbox.com,2a02:1348:178:42e9:24:19ff:fee1:ba6' (ECDSA) to the list of known hosts.
Welcome to Ubuntu 14.04.1 LTS (GNU/Linux 3.13.0-44-generic x86_64)

ubuntu@srv-dmw0k:~$ uptime
 18:06:26 up 0 min,  1 user,  load average: 0.35, 0.09, 0.03

Mapping a Cloud IP

To give your server a public IPv4 address, you need to map a Cloud IP to it. Cloud IPs are IPv4 addresses that belong to your account and can be moved between cloud servers (and some other resource types too such as load balancers).

In the server list find the Cloud IPs column and click Add + which brings up the Map Cloud IP dialog box. Select Create & map new Cloud IP from the drop down box and click Map.


This will create a new Cloud IP for your account and map it onto your new server. The Cloud IPs column will now show a 1, to show that 1 cloud ip is mapped to this server. You can hover over it with your mouse to get the details.

In this case we’ve been allocated the IP 109.107.38.214 with the identifier cip-7vlx0.

Your server is now accessible by the new Cloud IP, so you can ssh into it:

$ ssh -l ubuntu 109.107.38.214
The authenticity of host '109.107.38.214 (109.107.38.214)' can't be established.
ECDSA key fingerprint is f4:a0:2f:61:91:6e:4b:d0:3e:95:c4:ea:75:73:8e:85.
Are you sure you want to continue connecting (yes/no)? yes
Warning: Permanently added '109.107.38.214' (ECDSA) to the list of known hosts.
Welcome to Ubuntu 14.04.1 LTS (GNU/Linux 3.13.0-44-generic x86_64)

Last login: Fri Jan 30 18:06:24 2015 from 2001:470:1f0a:321:4c15:67a2:da3c:67b9
ubuntu@srv-dmw0k:~$

For convenience there is a DNS record that points to the first Cloud IP mapped to a server, in this case public.srv-dmw0k.gb1.brightbox.com

$ host public.srv-dmw0k.gb1.brightbox.com
public.srv-dmw0k.gb1.brightbox.com has address 109.107.38.214

Would you like to know more?

Here you used Brightbox Manager to create an Ubuntu server and then mapped a Cloud IP to it.

You might also want to learn more about accessing cloud servers or perhaps Cloud IPs. There are plenty of other guides available too.

Or perhaps you’d prefer to use our command line interface to manage your Brightbox Cloud resources?

Last updated: 14 Jun 2016 at 16:33 UTC

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